BibleTools.info

Bible Verse Explanations and Resources


Loading...

1 Kings 11:4

Matthew Henry
Concise Bible Commentary
There is not a more melancholy and astonishing instance of human depravity in the sacred Scriptures, than that here recorded. Solomon became a public worshipper of abominable idols! Probably he by degrees gave way to pride and luxury, and thus lost his relish for true wisdom. Nothing forms in itself a security against the deceitfulness and depravity of the human heart. Nor will old age cure the heart of any evil propensity. If our sinful passions are not crucified and mortified by the grace of God, they never will die of themselves, but will last even when opportunities to gratify them are taken away. Let him that thinks he stands, take heed lest he fall. We see how weak we are of ourselves, without the grace of God; let us therefore live in constant dependence on that grace. Let us watch and be sober: ours is a dangerous warfare, and in an enemy's country, while our worst foes are the traitors in our own hearts.
Ellen G. White
Testimonies on Sexual Behavior, Adultery, and Divorce, 191.2

Of Solomon, the inspired record says, “His wives turned away his heart after other gods: and his heart was not perfect with the Lord his God” (1 Kings 11:4). TSB 191.2

Read in context »
Ellen G. White
Testimonies on Sexual Behavior, Adultery, and Divorce, 189.3

Our pity, our love, to save you from reproach, has hurt you. My heart is so sad and agonized at times for you, I can only weep. I say, “Must he be lost? Must he, after suffering for the truth's sake, after standing in its defense until he is old and gray-headed, become an idolater, as did Solomon? Will he, for the love of a woman, trample down the law of God and look about him as much as to say, I do no sin; I am all right?” TSB 189.3

Read in context »
Ellen G. White
Testimonies for the Church, vol. 4, 508

God strictly forbade the intermarrying of His ancient people with other nations. The plea is now offered that this prohibition was made in order to prevent the Hebrews from marrying idolaters and forming connections with heathen families. But the heathen were in a more favorable condition than are the impenitent in this age, who, having the light of truth, yet persistently refuse to accept it. The sinner of today is far more guilty than the heathen, because the light of the gospel shines clearly all around him. He violates conscience and is a deliberate enemy of God. The reason which God assigned for forbidding these marriages was: “For they will turn away thy son from following Me.” Those among ancient Israel who ventured to disregard the prohibition of God did it at the sacrifice of religious principle. Take the case of Solomon for example. His wives turned away his heart from his God. 4T 508.1

Read in context »
Ellen G. White
The Retirement Years, 182.2

It has been said of men of gray hairs that there is no danger of their shrinking from their post of duty; but in the case of Solomon, when he became old, we learn that he lost his connection with God. And why?—Because he sought after the renown, honor, and riches of this world; because he took wives from among the idolatrous nations, and became allied with those nations. It is true that by this alliance he brought gold from Ophir and silver from Tarshish; but it was at the expense of virtue, of principle, of integrity of character. RY 182.2

Read in context »
Ellen G. White
Education, 49

The nation, of which he had been the pride, followed his leading. Though he afterward repented, his repentance did not prevent the fruition of the evil he had sown. The discipline and training that God appointed for Israel would cause them, in all their ways of life, to differ from the people of other nations. This peculiarity, which should have been regarded as a special privilege and blessing, was to them unwelcome. The simplicity and self-restraint essential to the highest development they sought to exchange for the pomp and self-indulgence of heathen peoples. To be “like all the nations” (1 Samuel 8:5) was their ambition. God's plan of education was set aside, His authority disowned. Ed 49.1

In the rejection of the ways of God for the ways of men, the downfall of Israel began. Thus also it continued, until the Jewish people became a prey to the very nations whose practices they had chosen to follow. Ed 50.1

As a nation the children of Israel failed of receiving the benefits that God desired to give them. They did not appreciate His purpose or co-operate in its execution. But though individuals and peoples may thus separate themselves from Him, His purpose for those who trust Him is unchanged. “Whatsoever God doeth, it shall be forever.” Ecclesiastes 3:14. Ed 50.2

Read in context »
Ellen G. White
Prophets and Kings, 56-9

The people began to complain. The respect and admiration they had once cherished for their king was changed into disaffection and abhorrence. PK 56.1

As a safeguard against dependence on the arm of flesh, the Lord had warned those who should rule over Israel not to multiply horses to themselves. But in utter disregard of this command, “Solomon had horses brought out of Egypt.” “And they brought unto Solomon horses out of Egypt, and out of all lands.” “Solomon gathered together chariots and horsemen: and he had a thousand and four hundred chariots, and twelve thousand horsemen, whom he bestowed in the cities for chariots, and with the king at Jerusalem.” 2 Chronicles 1:16; 9:28; 1 Kings 10:26. PK 56.2

More and more the king came to regard luxury, self-indulgence, and the favor of the world as indications of greatness. Beautiful and attractive women were brought from Egypt, Phoenicia, Edom, and Moab, and from many other places. These women were numbered by hundreds. Their religion was idol worship, and they had been taught to practice cruel and degrading rites. Infatuated with their beauty, the king neglected his duties to God and to his kingdom. PK 56.3

Read in context »
More Comments